Monthly Archives: October 2010

Ohio Upland Game Season Begins Nov. 5th

COLUMBUS, OH – The season for three of Ohio’s most popular game species—ring-necked pheasant, cottontail rabbit and bobwhite quail—begins Friday, November 5, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Wildlife.

“The state’s cottontail population has been very good for the last several years, and this year should provide some excellent opportunities for sportsmen,” said Nathan Stricker, project leader with the division’s Olentangy Wildlife Research Station.

According to Stricker, quail and pheasant populations may be lower than previous years. “Heavy snows that persisted on the ground for 8 to 10 weeks at the beginning of this year likely took their toll on upland game birds.  It is difficult to survive those conditions as food becomes scarce,” said Stricker.

Private lands enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) have been very important to supporting upland game populations. Williams and Defiance counties in northwest Ohio have strong pheasant populations because of the habitat contributions by local landowners. Upland game populations are responding positively to habitat programs in other areas around the state, especially in counties with significant enrollment in Scioto Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) and Quail Buffer practices in CRP known as CP33.

Cottontail rabbit hunting continues through February 28, 2011. Ring-necked pheasant hunting is open through January 9, 2011. Both seasons are closed during the statewide 2010 deer-gun hunting season, November 29 through December 5, as well as the extra weekend of deer-gun hunting December 18-19.

Rabbits, pheasants and quail may be hunted from sunrise to sunset. The daily bag limit for all three species remains unchanged from last year at four rabbits, two pheasants (roosters/males only) and four quail.

Hunters are reminded that snowshoe hares are not legal game in Ohio and may not be taken. Recently reintroduced to northeastern Ohio after nearly a century of absence, snowshoe hares are brown early in the season, resembling cottontail rabbits. To avoid confusion between cottontail rabbits and snowshoe hares, portions of Geauga and Ashtabula counties will be closed to all rabbit hunting from November 5 through December 5. The coats of most hares will have turned white by early December, allowing for proper distinction.

There are two restricted zones that cover portions of Geauga and Ashtabula counties. The first restricted area encompasses parts of Geauga and Ashtabula counties and is bordered by U.S. Route 6 to the north, U.S. Route 322 to the south, Kile Road to the west, and State Route 534 to the east. The second restricted area is in Ashtabula County bounded on the north by Cork-Cold Springs Road, on the west by Windsor-Mechanicsville Road, on the south by New Hudson Road and on the east by U.S. Route 45. A map of these two areas can be viewed in the 2010-2011 Ohio Hunting and Trapping Regulationsand on the Internet at wildohio.com.

The ODNR Division of Wildlife releases pheasants on selected public hunting areas throughout the state prior to opening day of the pheasant season, the second Saturday of the season and Thanksgiving Day. Hunters may call 1-800-WILDLIFE for locations of specific release sites.

Bobwhite quail hunting is limited to 16 counties in southern Ohio: Adams, Athens, Brown, Butler, Clermont, Clinton, Highland, Jackson, Meigs, Montgomery, Pike, Preble, Ross, Scioto, Vinton and Warren. The season continues through November 28.

Additional hunting information is contained in the 2010-2011 Ohio Hunting Regulations brochure, which is available where hunting licenses are sold, on the Internet at wildohio.com or by calling 1-800-WILDLIFE.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR Web site at www.ohiodnr.com.

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Ohio Fall Turkey Season First Five Days

COLUMBUS, OH - OCTOBER 9:  Ohio State Buckeyes...
Image by Getty Images via @daylife

COLUMBUS, OH – Hunters harvested 295 wild turkeys during the first five days of Ohio’s fall wild turkey hunting season, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Wildlife. The season opened on October 9 and will run through November 28.

Ohio Turkey ( It’s what comes up in an image search. Go Figure) ———–>

Last year, hunters killed 438 birds in the same time period. The top 10 counties for wild turkeys killed to date are: Ashtabula-24; Coshocton-20; Muskingum-13; Guernsey-12; Knox, Harrison, and Trumbull-11; Jackson-10; and Clermont, Holmes, and Washington-9.

Wild turkeys can be hunted in 48 counties during the fall season. More than 20,000 hunters pursued wild turkeys in Ohio last fall.

Fall wild turkey hunting hours are a half-hour before sunrise to sunset. The bag limit is one turkey of either sex per hunter for the fall season. A fall turkey permit is required in addition to a current Ohio hunting license. All turkeys killed must be taken to an official turkey check station by 8 p.m. on the day of harvest.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR Web site at www.ohiodnr.com.

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(EDITOR’S NOTE: The following is a breakdown by county of wild turkeys checked and tagged through October 13. The number taken during the 2009 fall turkey season is marked in (_): 2010 (2009); counties marked (NA) had no fall season in 2009. A final tally will be provided at the close of the season.)

Adams -5  (6); Ashland –10 (13); Ashtabula –24 (23); Athens –4 (11); Belmont –2 (8); Brown –6 (17); Carroll –3 (10); Clermont –9 (7); Columbiana –4 (6); Coshocton –20 (24); Cuyahoga -0 (0); Defiance –1 (5); Gallia –0 (5); Geauga –6 (10); Guernsey –12 (18); Harrison –11 (12); Highland –5 (14); Hocking –2 (9); Holmes –9 (12); Jackson –10 (12); Jefferson –5 (4); Knox –11 (8); Lake –1 (7); Lawrence –4 (12); Licking –7 (9); Lorain –3 (5); Mahoning –3 (3); Medina –5 (5); Meigs –6 (8); Monroe –4 (9); Morgan –7 (11); Morrow –3 (4); Muskingum –13 (5); Noble –2 (2); Perry –3 (15); Pike –7 (2); Portage –5 (9); Richland –5 (6); Ross –6 (15); Scioto –5 (9); Stark –7 (8); Summit -2 (4); Trumbull –11 (15); Tuscarawas –8 (17); Vinton –6 (6); Washington – 9 (15); Wayne – 2 (0) and Williams -2 (3). Preliminary total –295 (438).

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Erie Canal Heritage Center

The Old Erie Canal and its towpath at Kirkvill...
Image via Wikipedia

WATERFORD, N.Y. – In the town of Albion, New York, a tugboat lounges in placid waters, secured by its mooring ropes. Nearby, a sage-green bridge appears in soft focus across the same waters—those of the Erie Canal.

A peaceful stroll along the canal banks at Albion is just one of the many attractions that the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor offers. This water-based network of communities in upstate New York is a fine travel destination. Read this week’s article in the National Park Getaway travel series, and you’ll find that in addition to tranquil vignettes like the scene at Albion, the Erie Canalway boasts history and outdoor recreation.

Ride on a canal boat, check out locks and bridges, and wander through towns like Seneca Falls, where an old knitting mill still stands. Go for a bike ride on the Erie Canalway Trail, where you can pedal through delicate morning mist and gaze at the rich greens (or—in autumn—yellows, oranges, and reds) of the trees that border the famous watercourse.

Reds and greens, historic towns and structures: the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor is saturated with local color. Visit www.nps.gov/getaways to start planning your navigation of the waterway, as well as to access 69 previous Getaway articles.

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Ohio Fall Foliage: Week Four

COLUMBUS, OH – Dynamic blazes of orange, yellow, red and rust will provide the perfect backdrop for hikers who are ready to reconnect with the natural world this weekend. ODNR is reporting near peak and peak fall foliage in most parts of the state.

“There are many organized hikes planned at Ohio state parks and nature preserves this weekend that will provide Ohioans and visitors to the Buckeye State an amazing perspective of some of the state’s most spectacular natural terrain,” said Casey Munchel, fall foliage expert for the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Forestry. “State parks like Lake Hope and preserves like Clifton Gorge are stunning on a normal day, but when these places are draped with beautiful fall color, the experience is breathtaking.”

In addition, the brilliance of fall color will add to the excitement of games of disc golf and golf, which can be played on beautiful, award-winning courses at several state parks. Anglers and boaters can also get priceless perspectives of amazing fall foliage as it reflects in the rippling water along miles of shoreline and waterways. And the Division of Wildlife is currently in the middle of their annual fall trout stocking so go towww.wildohio.com to find the nearest pond or lake in your area.

One of the best parts of the state this weekend will be up in northeastern Ohio where there is lots to do and see.

“Visitors to Lake County on the east side of Lake Erie can enjoy exceptional fall foliage, the largest winery district in the Grand River Valley and waterfront dining,” said Bob Ulas, Executive Director of the Lake County Visitors Bureau.  “Although Lake County is Ohio’s smallest county, it offers two seasons, thus a longer viewing period of fall foliage.  Due to Lake County’s proximity to Lake Erie’s warmer waters, colors peak later while one mile inland, colors peak earlier.  For more info, visit www.lakevisit.com.”

This coming weekend, check out one of the following events at one of your Ohio State Parks or local partners…

Halloween CampoutRocky Fork (SW) – Oct. 15-16. Campsite decorating and costume contests, movies , silent auction, games and a haunted trail.  (937) 393-4284.

Halloween CampoutForked Run (SE) – Oct. 16. Campsite decorating contest, games, trick or treat, & spooky hayrides. (740) 767-3570.

Grandma Gatewood’s Fall Colors HikeHocking Hills (SE) – Oct. 16, 1 PM at the Old Man’s Cave Visitor Center. 6-mile strenuous hike. (740) 385-6841.

Fall HikeShawnee (SW) – Oct. 16, 9 AM. 5-mile hike with refreshments available at the half-way point. Evening entertainment and a bean dinner are also offered. (740) 858-6652.

Howl-o-Ween Dog Walk & Costume Parade, Mosquito Lake (NE) – Oct. 17, 2-4 PM at the DogPark. Food, vendors & contests for people and pets. (330) 637-2856.

Forest Heritage FestivalTuscarawas County Fairgrounds (NE) – Oct. 15-16.  Entertainment, food, games, craft booths, old-time fiddling, and lumberjack show.  Admission and parking are free.  (330) 339-3991

To find out more about these and other events, visit www.ohiodnr.com. The site will serve as a premier guide to Ohio’s fall color season. Its pages provide information for travelers who want to map a scenic road tripadventurers who are refreshed and energized by the cool autumn weather, vacationers who seek places of solace to enjoy the changing seasons and even the students who need a resource for leaf collection projects. Ohioans and out-of-state visitors can also find information about fall foliage by calling 1-800-BUCKEYE or visiting www.discoverohio.com/autumnadventures.

Ohio’s 74 state parks, 21 state forests and 134 state nature preserves provide excellent locations to view fall foliage. Here are the most current reports from selected locations:

Location Region Color Condition
Alum/Delaware Creek State Parks Central Peak
Beaver Creek/Guilford Lake State Parks East Near Peak
Blackhand Gorge Nature Preserve Central Near Peak
Dillon/Blue Rock State Parks East Near Peak
Buck Creek State Park West Peak
Burr Oak State Park Southeast Peak
Caesar Creek State Park Southwest Peak
Clifton Gorge Nature Preserve West Peak
Deer Creek State Park Central Near Peak
Harrison Lake State Park/Forest Northwest Near Peak
Hocking Hills State Park/Forest Southeast Changing
Hueston Woods State Park Southwest Near Peak
Indian Lake State Park West Peak
John Bryan State Park West Peak
Kent Bog Nature Preserve Northeast Peak
Kiser Lake State Park West Peak
Lake Hope State Park Southeast Near Peak
Malabar Farm State Park Northeast Changing
Maumee State Park/Forest Northwest Near Peak
Mohican State Park/Forest Northeast Near Peak
Mt. Gilead State Park Central Peak
Pike Lake/Paint Creek State Parks Southwest Changing
Punderson State Park Northeast Peak
Quail Hollow/Wingfoot State Parks Northeast Near Peak
Salt Fork State Park East Near Peak
Shawnee State Park Southwest Near Peak
Sycamore State Park West Near Peak
Tar Hollow State Park/Forest Southeast Peak
Triangle Lake Bog Northeast Peak
Van Buren State Park Northwest Peak
Zaleski State Forest Southeast Near Peak

COLOR CONDITION KEY: Changing – Still mostly green, less than 25 percent color. Near Peak – Significant color showing – anywhere from 30 to 60 percent color. Peak – Peak colors – as much as 85 percent showing. Fading – Fading from peak conditions and leaves falling to forest floor.

Ohio Fall Foliage Update: Week Three

Ulmus rubra leaf in fall
Image via Wikipedia

And Fall Festivals, Harvest events, and Halloween!

COLUMBUS, OH – Fall color is starting to come on this week with the seasonally cool temperatures. ODNR is reporting near peak fall foliage in shades of red, orange, gold and yellow in areas throughout Ohio.

“Pockets of color are becoming more noticeable in both the rural and urban landscape,” said Casey Munchel, fall foliage expert for the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Forestry. “Ohio has more than 100 hardwood tree species and the variety of species contributes to the variety of colors.”

The diversity of Ohio’s forests make autumn one of the most beautiful times to be outdoors. Maple trees produce a red pigment, anthocyanin; oaks produce a brown color from tannin, a bitter waste product; hickory and beech trees reveal yellows and golds that come from carotenoids.

Leaf peepers can expect to find peak fall color during the second and third weeks of October throughout Ohio.

Fall wild turkey hunting opens in 48 Ohio counties on Saturday, October 9 and continues through Sunday, November 28.  Ruffed grouse hunting season also starts Saturday, October 9 and runs through January 31, 2011.  For more info on fall wild turkey or ruffed grouse hunting, go to www.wildohio.com.

This coming weekend, check out one of the following events at one of your Ohio State Parks…

Halloween CampoutPaint Creek (SW) – Oct. 8-9. Campsite decorating and costume contests, hay rides & trick or treatl. (937) 981-7061 or (937) 393-4284.

Halloween CampoutLake Loramie (NW) – Oct. 8-10. Pumpkin carving, campsite decorating, trick or treat, movies, games & a potluck supper.  (937) 295-2011.

Fall Color WalkMalabar Farm (NE) – Oct. 9, 10 AM-Noon. Meet at the visitor center. 2-mile hike. (419) 892-2784.

Fall FestivalPunderson (NE) – Oct. 9. Costume and pumpkin contests, trick or treat, hayrides, games & a campfire.  (440) 564-2279 or www.friendsofpunderson.com.

Fall Color Canoe TourVan Buren (NW) – Oct. 10, 2-3:30 PM. $10 donation per canoe benefits the friends of Van Buren State Park. Pre-registration required by Oct. 8. (419) 348-7679.

To find out more about these and other events, visit www.ohiodnr.com. The site will serve as a premier guide to Ohio’s fall color season. Its pages provide information for travelers who want to map a scenic road tripadventurers who are refreshed and energized by the cool autumn weather, vacationers who seekplaces of solace to enjoy the changing seasons and even the students who need a resource for leaf collection projects. Ohioans and out-of-state visitors can also find information about fall foliage by calling 1-800-BUCKEYE or visiting www.discoverohio.com/autumnadventures.

Ohio’s 74 state parks, 21 state forests and 134 state nature preserves provide excellent locations to view fall foliage. Here are the most current reports from selected locations:

Location Region Color Condition
Alum/Delaware Creek State Parks Central Near Peak
Beaver Creek/Guilford Lake State Parks East Changing
Blackhand Gorge Nature Preserve Central Changing
Dillon/Blue Rock State Parks East Near Peak
Buck Creek State Park West Changing
Burr Oak State Park Southeast Changing
Caesar Creek State Park Southwest Changing
Clifton Gorge Nature Preserve West Changing
Deer Creek State Park Central Near Peak
Harrison Lake State Park/Forest Northwest Near Peak
Hocking Hills State Park/Forest Southeast Changing
Hueston Woods State Park Southwest Near Peak
Indian Lake State Park West Near Peak
John Bryan State Park West Near Peak
Kent Bog Nature Preserve Northeast Near Peak
Kiser Lake State Park West Changing
Lake Hope State Park Southeast Changing
Malabar Farm State Park Northeast Changing
Maumee State Park/Forest Northwest Changing
Mohican State Park/Forest Northeast Near Peak
Mt. Gilead State Park Central Near Peak
Pike Lake/Paint Creek State Parks Southwest Changing
Punderson State Park Northeast Near Peak
Quail Hollow/Wingfoot State Parks Northeast Changing
Salt Fork State Park East Near Peak
Shawnee State Park Southwest Near Peak
Sycamore State Park West Near Peak
Tar Hollow State Park/Forest Southeast Near Peak
Triangle Lake Bog Northeast Near Peak
Van Buren State Park Northwest Changing
Zaleski State Forest Southeast Near Peak

COLOR CONDITION KEY: Changing – Still mostly green, less than 25 percent color. Near Peak – Significant color showing – anywhere from 30 to 60 percent color. Peak – Peak colors – as much as 85 percent showing. Fading – Fading from peak conditions and leaves falling to forest floor.
The Ohio Department of Natural Resources ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR web site at www.ohiodnr.gov.

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