Tag Archives: Game

Ohio Deer Hunters Have Successful Season

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COLUMBUS, OH – A total of 261,314 deer were killed during Ohio’s 2009-10 hunting season, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife. This season’s total surpasses the 2008-09 record total of 252,017.

“Ohio deer hunters had another great year and continue to play a vital role in managing Ohio’s deer herd. They’ve embraced regulation changes which increased the harvest of antlerless deer and they’ve donated a significant amount of venison to feed the less fortunate in Ohio through the Farmers and Hunters Feeding the Hungry program,” said David M. Graham, chief of the Division of Wildlife.

Counties reporting the highest number of deer checked during the season were: Coshocton-9,635, Tuscarawas-9,009, Licking-8,571, Guernsey-8,289, Harrison-8,043, Muskingum-7,864, Knox-7,174, Holmes-6,211, Belmont-6,160, and Jefferson-5,888.

The deer-gun season resulted in the greatest portion of the overall harvest with 114,281 deer taken. Archery hunters took a total of 91,521 deer. Deer killed during the early muzzleloader season (491), at controlled hunts (690), youth-gun season (9,270), the extra deer-gun weekend (20,054), and the statewide muzzleloader season (25,007) added to the overall total.

The white-tailed deer is the most popular game animal in Ohio, frequently pursued by generations of hunters. Ohio ranks 8th nationally in annual hunting-related sales and 10th in the number of jobs associated with the hunting-related industry. Each year, hunting has an $859 million economic impact in Ohio through the sale of equipment, fuel, food, lodging and more.

Ohio’s first modern day deer-gun season opened in 1943 in three counties, when hunters harvested 168 deer. In 1956, deer hunting was allowed in all 88 counties and hunters killed 3,911 deer during that one-week season.

Hunters were encouraged to kill more does this season and donate extra venison to organizations assisting Ohioans in need. The Division of Wildlife collaborated with Farmers and Hunters Feeding the Hungry (FHFH) to help pay for the processing of donated venison. Hunters who gave their deer to food banks were not required to pay the processing cost as long as the deer were taken to participating processors. Counties being served by this program can be found online at http://fhfh.org/. Anyone interested in forming a chapter in an area not served should contact FHFH directly.

Open houses will be held on Saturday, March 6 in each of the state’s five wildlife districts to provide the public an opportunity to view and discuss proposed hunting and trapping regulations with state wildlife officials. Directions to the open houses can be obtained by calling 1-800-WILDLIFE or visiting wildohio.com .

A statewide hearing on all the proposed rules will be held at 9 a.m., Thursday, March 4 at the wildlife division’s District One Office, located at 1500 Dublin Road in Columbus. After considering public input, the Ohio Wildlife Council will vote on the proposed rules and season dates during its April 7 meeting.

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Ohio Proposed 2010-2011 Deer Hunting Seasons

Deer Hunting Trip 06 098
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COLUMBUS, OH – Hunters in seven northwest Ohio counties will be given a higher deer bag limit if the proposed regulation is accepted by the Ohio Wildlife Council in April, according to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Wildlife.

A proposed change to the deer zones includes moving seven northwest Ohio counties from Deer Zone A to Zone B. The counties are Defiance, Fulton, Henry, Lucas, Paulding, Van Wert and Williams.

A proposal to eliminate the requirement that hunters must purchase a regular deer permit before purchasing antlerless deer permits was heard. The sale of reduced priced antlerless permits would cease after November 28, so hunters need to commit early to buying and using the extra reduced-cost permits to take full advantage of this opportunity.

Under the proposal, hunters could again buy antlerless deer permits at reduced prices for hunting in an urban zone, participating in a Division of Wildlife-authorized controlled hunt or hunting during the September 25 to November 28 portion of the deer season. The division is again proposing the deadline for using the antlerless permit be extended to December 5 for those hunting in Deer Zone C. Cost of the antlerless deer permit remains $15.

The maximum number of deer that a hunter may take in Deer Zone A is two. Prior to November 29, hunters may take up to two deer in Zone A, one of which may be on a $15 antlerless deer permit. Beginning November 29, hunters may take only one deer in Zone A and antlerless permits may not be used.

The maximum number of deer that a hunter may take in Deer Zone B is four. Prior to November 29, hunters may take up to four deer in Zone B, two of which may be on $15 antlerless deer permits. Beginning November 29, hunters may take only two deer in Zone B and antlerless permits may not be used.

The maximum number of deer that a hunter may take in Deer Zone C is six. Prior to December 6, hunters may take up to six deer in Zone C, three of which may be on $15 antlerless deer permits. Beginning December 6, hunters may take only three deer in Zone C and antlerless permits may not be used.

Those hunting in urban zones and at Division of Wildlife-authorized controlled hunts would again have a six-deer bag limit, and those deer would not count against the hunter’s zone bag limit.

Either a $15 antlerless deer permit or $24 deer permit and a valid hunting license are required to hunt deer in Ohio. A hunter may take only one buck in Ohio, regardless of zone, hunting method or season.

Seasons and Dates

* Archery season – September 25 through February 6, 2011
* Special area muzzleloader hunts – October 18-23
* Youth deer-gun season – November 20-21
* Statewide deer-gun season – November 29 through December 5 and December 18-19
* Statewide muzzleloader season – January 8-11, 2011

A proposed change during the December 18-19 portion of the deer-gun season would allow other legal game species in season to be pursued by hunters meeting specified requirements, such as the hunter orange requirement for deer-gun season.

During the 2009-2010 season, which concludes February 7, hunters are expected to bag a record total of about 260,000 deer. Approximately 475,000 people hunted white-tailed deer in Ohio this year.

Open houses will be held on Saturday, March 6 in each of the state’s five wildlife districts to provide the public an opportunity to view and discuss proposed hunting and trapping regulations with state wildlife officials. For directions to the open houses, please call 1-800-WILDLIFE or visit wildohio.com on the Internet.

A statewide hearing on all the proposed rules will be held at 9 a.m., Thursday, March 4 at the Division of Wildlife’s District One Office, located at 1500 Dublin Road in Columbus. After considering public input, the Ohio Wildlife Council will vote on the proposed rules and season dates during its April 7 meeting.

Proposed Deer Hunting Zones
(FOR THE 2010-11 SEASON: Those counties proposed to move from Deer Zone A to Zone B are bolded)

Zone A — The zone includes 13 counties: Allen, Auglaize, Darke, Erie, Mercer, Miami, Montgomery, Ottawa, Preble, Putnam, Sandusky, Shelby and Wood.

Zone B — The zone includes 37 counties: Ashland, Ashtabula, Butler, Champaign, Clark, Clinton, Crawford, Cuyahoga, Defiance, Fayette, Fulton, Geauga, Greene, Hancock, Hardin, Henry, Huron, Lake, Logan, Lorain, Lucas, Madison, Mahoning, Marion, Medina, Paulding, Portage, Seneca, Stark, Summit, Trumbull, Union, Van Wert, Warren, Wayne, Williams and Wyandot.

Zone C — The zone includes 38 counties: Adams, Athens, Belmont, Brown, Carroll, Clermont, Columbiana, Coshocton, Delaware, Fairfield, Franklin, Gallia, Guernsey, Hamilton, Harrison, Highland, Hocking, Holmes, Jackson, Jefferson, Knox, Lawrence, Licking, Meigs, Monroe, Morgan, Morrow, Muskingum, Noble, Perry, Pickaway, Pike, Richland, Ross, Scioto, Tuscarawas, Vinton and Washington.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources ensures a balance between wise use and protection of our natural resources for the benefit of all. Visit the ODNR web site at ohiodnr.com

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PA Sportsmen and Hunting Clubs Urged to Participate in State Pheasant Chick and Egg Program

Fruits of the hunt!
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HARRISBURG — Sportsmen’s organizations with approved propagation facilities can augment local ring-necked pheasant stockings and increase localized recreational hunting opportunities by raising day‑old pheasant chicks supplied free-of-charge by the Pennsylvania Game Commission.
Applications to participate can be downloaded from the agency’s website (www.pgc.state.pa.us), by clicking on “Self Help,” then “Forms & Programs” and then selecting “Pheasant Chick & Egg Program.” In order for Game Farm superintendents to plan and set hatches to accommodate requests, the Bureau of Wildlife Management must receive completed applications by March 31.
“To restore self-sustaining and huntable pheasant populations, the Game Commission is committed to creating Wild Pheasant Recovery Areas, as outlined in our pheasant management plan,” said Calvin W. DuBrock, Game Commission Bureau of Wildlife Management director. “While we strive to create these areas, we continue to urge interested clubs to participate in our pheasant chick and egg programs, which provide wonderful opportunities to get young people involved in raising birds. In addition to learning about the food and habitat requirements of pheasants, they’ll have the chance to see the chicks mature into adult game birds, and to help increase hunting opportunities.”
In 1929, the Game Commission began the propagation of pheasants on an extensive scale with the establishment of two game farms. Over the next six decades, to off‑set the increasing demand for pheasants from hunters, three other farms were placed into operation, and the day‑old pheasant chick program was implemented and made available to sportsmen’s organizations, 4‑H clubs, farmers, and other cooperators for rearing and releasing on areas open to public hunting.
In 1959, the number of pheasant chicks distributed to cooperators reached 229,685, an all-time high, in addition to the more than 88,500 pheasants raised and released by the agency at its four game farms. Unfortunately, cooperator participation has dwindled significantly over the last few decades. In recent years, only a dozen or so clubs have participated; raising and releasing 3,000-4,000 birds.
Because of budgetary constraints, the Game Commission was forced, in 2005, to reduce its annual pheasant stocking allocation from 200,000 to 100,000. The Game Commission released 100,000 adult birds again this past season, and expects to keep pheasant production at 100,000 until additional financial resources are made available. However, as part of the agency’s pheasant management plan, the agency intends to increase that stocking effort to 250,000 birds, should increased funding become available.
DuBrock said that the agency provides, free of charge, day-old pheasant chicks to clubs entering into an agreement with the Game Commission to raise birds and promote recreational hunting on lands open to public hunting. Gender is not determined as the chicks are boxed for distribution, but are generally at a one-to-one male/female ratio. The number of chicks received depends on the size of the club’s facility. The agency will provide enrolled clubs with plans for a brooder building, covered pen, and guidelines for rearing pheasants.
“The agency also offers enrolled organizations technical assistance and advice at the club’s facility, and a training session and overview of agency game farm operations can be scheduled during the off‑season from January through March to assist in development of the club’s program,” DuBrock said.
To be eligible to receive pheasant chicks, a sportsmen’s club is required to have a minimum of 25 square feet of covered pen space available per bird. In addition, 72 square inches of floor space per chick is recommended in the brooder building. All feed and expenses incurred in the work of constructing covered pens and raising pheasants will be the responsibility of the club. All pheasants propagated by organizations must be released on lands open to public hunting.
Pheasant chicks can be raised at the cooperator’s facility or by a designated caretaker with the proper facilities.
“Youth who participate in raising birds can help release hen pheasants in early September in areas where hens are protected from hunting and where habitat is sufficient to provide food and cover,” DuBrock said. “These birds can provide good dog training opportunities and releasing hens early also provides additional room in the pen to finish growing out the males for the hunting season.
“Maximum recreational opportunities can be attained by releasing male pheasants as close to the opening of small game season as possible, and no later than the end of the second week of the season.”
Game Commission pheasant hatches come off once a week during the month of May, and the chicks for clubs will be scheduled into those hatches. Game farm superintendents will send notification to approved organizations when chicks will be ready for pick‑up.
The Game Commission requires a complete report of the production and release results. Renewal applications will not be processed unless a complete report has been filed for the prior year.
In addition to the cooperating sportsmen’s club program, the agency also sells surplus day-old hen pheasant chicks and eggs in lots of 100 chicks for $60, or 300 eggs for $180. Early requests receive top priority and orders are processed until the last scheduled hatch, which usually is the first week of June. While day-old hen pheasant chicks may be purchased by anyone, pheasant eggs will be sold only to licensed game propagators. Both eggs and chicks must be picked up at the supplying Game Commission game farm.
The pheasant is native to Asia. Recorded attempts to establish pheasants in North America date back to the mid 1700s. These early attempts were unsuccessful; it wasn’t until 1881, in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, that pheasants first became established.
During the early 1890s, Pennsylvania citizens purchased pheasants from English gamekeepers and released them in Lehigh and Northampton counties. For several decades, many other small releases were made across the Commonwealth to establish pheasants for sport hunting.
In the early 1900s, the Game Commission set aside a special appropriation of funds to purchase and propagate game. Pheasant eggs were purchased and given to agency refuge keepers, sportsmen’s organizations and private individuals interested in raising pheasants. The first stocking of pheasants by the Game Commission occurred by 1915.
For more information on pheasants and the history of the agency’s pheasant management plan and propagation program, visit the Game Commission’s website (www.pgc.state.pa.us), select “Hunting Home” from the “Recreation” drop-down menu then click on the pheasant photograph.

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New Record Ohio Deer

Seal of Highland County, Ohio
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DAYTON, OHIO – The Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR) Division of Wildlife announced that another record setting deer has been harvested in southwestern Ohio. On Saturday, January 30, 2010, the 18-point nontypical (nonsymmetrical antlered) deer taken by Brian Stephens on November 30, 2009 with a muzzleloader in Highland County was officially scored.

Brian Stephens with friends and family by his side excitedly awaited the official score Saturday morning in Xenia. The buck was scored by Mike Wendel, David Haney and Ron Perrine; certified scorers with Buckeye Big Bucks Club (BBBC). Gary Trent, BBBC President, announced the score as 232 5/8 certifying it as the new state record. It’s the largest non-typical rack ever taken with a muzzleloader in Ohio history beating out the 2004 record of 225. The 35 1/8 inch left main beam is a Boone and Crockett largest ever recorded and the right main bean measured an impressive 34 1/8 inches. Marty Murphy of National Muzzle Loading Rifle Association said the score will be recognized as the largest ever in Ohio according to the Associations Longhunter Big Game Record Book. This magnificent animal will also be a record for World Classics in the mens muzzleloading category according to Dan Stapleton. The World Classics scoring system does not include deductions and the main beam outside spread measurement is added. Under these scoring criteria the Stephens Buck scores 252 0/8.

“Deer hunting in Ohio continues to prove itself as world-class,” said Todd Haines, Wildlife District Five Manager. “We are seeing the benefits of a successful whitetail deer management program.”Brian Stephens’ deer is one more record to add to the books in Ohio. In the last decade southwest Ohio has been the setting for numerous records. The Beatty Buck, harvested in Greene County in the fall of 2000 by Mike Beatty, holds the record for nontypical at 304 6/8 and currently ranks as the number one nontypical buck in Ohio, the largest nontypical whitetail deer ever taken by a bow hunter. A typical white-tailed deer killed by Brad Jerman in 2004 in Warren County, known as the Jerman Buck, became an Ohio record with a score of 201 1/8. In 2006 a world-class buck was harvested by Jonathan Schmucker in Adams County. The deer was scored at 34-point nontypical, 291 2/8 Boone and Crockett and 305 7/8 World Classics. Also that year the Metzner Buck, harvested by Justin Metzner scored 196 6/8 which positioned it to be the second largest deer harvest with a compound bow in Ohio; the fifth largest typical deer taken in the world in the Pope and Young record book; and Buckmaster’s seventh all time typical white-tailed deer harvested with a compound bow.

“When we are continually in the record books with large nontypical and typical whitetails harvested Ohio, we attract the attention of hunters that might have hunted in another state,” said Haines. “The hunters staying and coming into Ohio create a boost in our economy. Each year, hunting has an 859 million dollar economic impact in Ohio through the sale of equipment, fuel, food and lodging as well as supporting thousands of jobs.”

Ohio’s first modern day deer-gun season opened in 1943 in three counties, where hunters harvested 168 deer. In 1956, deer hunting was allowed in all 88 counties and hunters killed 3,911 deer during that one-week season.

A detailed listing of deer-hunting rules is contained in the 2009-2010 Ohio Hunting Regulations, available where licenses are sold. It may also be viewed online at www.wildohio.com . Hunters who wish to share their success can submit a photo of themselves and their deer at this website also.

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Pennsylvania Proposed 2010-2011 Hunting Seasons and Bag Limits

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PROPOSED 2010-11 HUNTING SEASONS AND BAG LIMITS

SQUIRRELS, Red, Gray, Black and Fox (Combined): Special season for eligible junior hunters, with or without required license, and mentored youth – Oct. 9-15 (6 daily, 12 in possession limit after first day).

SQUIRRELS, Red, Gray, Black and Fox (Combined): Oct. 16-Nov. 27; Dec. 13-23 and Dec. 27-Feb. 5 (6 daily, 12 possession).

RUFFED GROUSE: Oct. 16–Nov. 27, Dec. 13-23 and Dec. 27-Jan. 22 (2 daily, 4 possession).

RABBIT (Cottontail) Special season for eligible junior hunters, with or without required license: Oct. 9-16 (4 daily, 8 possession).

RABBIT (Cottontail): Oct. 23-Nov. 27, Dec. 13-23 and Dec. 27-Feb. 26 (4 daily, 8 possession).

PHEASANT: Special season for eligible junior hunters, with or without required license – Oct. 9-16 (2 daily, 4 in possession). Male pheasants only in WMUs 2A, 2B, 2C, 4C, 4E, 5A and 5B. Male and female pheasants may be taken in all other WMUs. There is no open season for the taking of pheasants in any Wild Pheasant Recovery Areas in any WMU.

PHEASANT: Male only in WMUs 2A, 2B, 2C, 4C, 4E, 5A and 5B – Oct. 23-Nov. 27. Male and female may be taken in all other WMUs – Oct. 23-Nov. 27, Dec. 13-23 and Dec. 27-Feb. 5 (2 daily, 4 in possession). There is no open season for the taking of pheasants in any Wild Pheasant Recovery Areas in any WMU.

BOBWHITE QUAIL: No open season, except captive raised or propagated bobwhite quail may be taken on regulated hunting grounds, and public and private lands by permit.

HARES (SNOWSHOE RABBITS) OR VARYING HARES: Dec. 27–Jan. 1 (1 daily, 2 possession).

WOODCHUCKS (GROUNDHOGS): No closed season, except: Sundays; during the antlered and antlerless deer seasons; and until noon daily during the spring gobbler turkey season.

CROWS: July 2-April 10, on Friday, Saturday and Sunday only. No limit.

STARLINGS AND ENGLISH SPARROWS: No closed season, except during the antlered and antlerless deer seasons and until noon daily during the spring gobbler turkey season. No limit.

WILD TURKEY (Male or Female): Wildlife Management Units 1A, 1B and 2A (Shotgun and bow and arrow) – Oct. 30-Nov. 13; WMU 2B (Shotgun and bow and arrow) – Oct. 30- Nov. 19; WMUs 2C, 2D, 2E, 4A, 4B and 4D – Oct. 30-Nov. 13; WMUs 2F, 2G, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 4C and 4E – Oct. 30-Nov. 19; WMU 5A – Nov. 2-4; WMUs 5B, 5C and 5D – CLOSED TO FALL TURKEY HUNTING.

SPRING GOBBLER (Bearded bird only): Special season for eligible junior hunters, with required license, and mentored youth – April 23, 2011. Only 1 spring gobbler may be taken during this hunt.

SPRING GOBBLER (Bearded bird only): April 30-May 31, 2011. Daily limit 1, season limit 2. (Second spring gobbler may only be taken by persons who possess a valid special wild turkey license.)

BLACK BEAR (Statewide) Bow and Arrow only: Nov. 15-19. Only 1 bear may be taken during the license year.

BLACK BEAR (Statewide): Nov. 20, 22-23. Only 1 bear may be taken during the license year.

ELK (Antlered or Antlerless): Nov. 1-6. Only one elk may be taken during the license year. The Board will decide later on an allocation of elk licenses for the 2010 season.

ELK, EXTENDED (Antlered and Antlerless): Nov. 8-13. Only one elk may be taken during the license year. Eligible elk license recipients who haven’t harvested an elk by Nov. 6, in designated areas.

Elk, Special Conservation Tag (Antlered or Antlerless): Sept. 1-Nov. 6. One elk tag for one antlered or antlerless elk will be auctioned at the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation annual banquet.

DEER, ARCHERY (Antlerless Only) WMUs 2B, 5C and 5D: Sept. 18-Oct. 1 and Nov. 15-27. One antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

DEER, ARCHERY (Antlered and Antlerless) WMUs 2B, 5C and 5D: Oct. 2-Nov. 13 and Dec. 27-Jan. 29. One antlered deer per hunting license year. One antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

DEER, ARCHERY (Antlered and Antlerless) Statewide: Oct. 2-Nov. 13 and Dec. 27-Jan. 15. One antlered deer per hunting license year. One antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

DEER (Antlered and Antlerless) WMUs 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B, 2F, 3A, 3B, 3D, 4A, 4C, 5A, 5B, 5C and 5D: Nov. 29-Dec. 11. One antlered deer per hunting license year. An antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

DEER (Antlered Only) WMUs 2C, 2D, 2E, 2G, 3C, 4B, 4D and 4E: Nov. 29-Dec. 3. One antlered deer per hunting license year. (Holders of valid DMAP antlerless deer permits may harvest antlerless deer on DMAP properties during this period.)

DEER (Antlered and Antlerless) WMUs 2C, 2D, 2E, 2G, 3C, 4B, 4D and 4E: Dec. 4-11. One antlered deer per hunting license year. An antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

DEER, ANTLERLESS (Statewide): Oct. 21-23. Junior and Senior License Holders, Disabled Person Permit (to use a vehicle) Holders, and Pennsylvania residents serving on active duty in
U.S. Armed Services or in the U.S. Coast Guard only, with required antlerless license. Also included are persons who have reached or will reach their 65th birthday in the year of the application for a license and hold a valid adult license, or qualify for license and fee exemptions under section 2706. One antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

DEER, ANTLERLESS MUZZLELOADER (Statewide): Oct. 16-23. An antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

DEER, ANTLERED OR ANTLERLESS FLINTLOCK (Statewide): Dec. 27-Jan. 15. One antlered per hunting license year, or one antlerless deer and an additional antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

DEER, ANTLERED OR ANTLERLESS FLINTLOCK (WMUs 2B, 5C, 5D): Dec. 27-Jan. 29. One antlered per hunting license year, or one antlerless deer and an additional antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

DEER, Antlerless (WMUs 2B, 5C and 5D): Dec. 27-Jan. 29. An antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

DEER, ANTLERLESS (Military Bases): Hunting permitted on days established by the U.S. Department of the Army at Letterkenny Army Depot, Franklin County; New Cumberland Army Depot, York County; and Fort Detrick, Raven Rock Site, Adams County. An antlerless deer with each required antlerless license.

PROPOSED 2010-11 FURBEARER HUNTING SEASONS

COYOTES: No closed season. Unlimited. Outside of any deer or bear season, coyotes may be taken with a hunting license or a furtaker license, and without wearing orange. During any archery deer season, coyotes may be taken while lawfully hunting deer or with a furtaker license. During the regular firearms deer and any bear seasons, coyotes may be taken while lawfully hunting deer or bear, or with a furtaker license while wearing 250 square inches of fluorescent orange. During the spring gobbler season, may be taken by those with a valid tag and meet fluorescent orange and shot size requirements.

RACCOON and FOXES: Oct. 23–Feb. 19, unlimited.

OPOSSUM, SKUNKS & WEASELS: No closed season, except Sundays and prior to noon during the spring gobbler season. No limits.

BOBCAT (WMUs 2A, 2C, 2E, 2F, 2G, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 4A, 4D and 4E): Dec. 18-Jan. 8. One bobcat per license year, but all licensed furtakers may obtain one permit.

PROPOSED 2010-11 TRAPPING SEASONS

MINK and MUSKRAT: Nov. 20–Jan. 9. Unlimited.

COYOTE, FOXES, OPOSSUM, RACCOON, SKUNKS and WEASELS: Oct. 24–Feb. 20. No limit.

COYOTE and FOXES (Statewide) Cable Restraints: Dec. 26-Feb. 20. No limit. Participants must pass cable restraint certification course.

BEAVER (Statewide): Dec. 26–March 31 (Limits vary depending on WMU).

BOBCAT (WMUs 2A, 2C, 2E, 2F, 2G, 3A, 3B, 3C, 3D, 4A, 4D and 4E): Dec. 18-Jan. 9. One bobcat per license year, but all licensed furtakers may obtain one permit.

FISHER (WMUs 2C, 2D, 2E and 2F): Dec. 18-23. One fisher per license year, but all licensed furtakers may obtain one permit.

PROPOSED 2010-11 FALCONRY SEASONS

SQUIRRELS (combined), RUFFED GROUSE, COTTONTAIL RABBITS, SNOWSHOE OR VARYING HARE, RINGNECK PHEASANT (Male or Female combined): Sept. 1-March 31. Daily and Field Possession limits vary. (Migratory game bird seasons and bag limits for falconers will be set in accordance with federal regulations in August.)

BOBWHITE QUAIL: No open season, except captive raised or propagated bobwhite quail may be taken on regulated hunting grounds, and public and private lands by permit.

No open season on other wild birds or mammals. Waterfowl and Migratory Game Bird seasons will be established in accordance with Federal Regulations this summer.

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